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  1. Generic Lexapro Approved by FDA

    The FDA approved the first generic version of the popular antidepressant Lexapro (escitalopram) today.

  2. New Birth Control Pill Recall

    Seven lots of generic birth control pills have been recalled by Glenmark. The pills are packaged backwards. This means women may take the wrong pills on the wrong day, risking unwanted pregnancy.

  3. Infant Tylenol Recalled

    574,000 bottles of infant Tylenol have been recalled by Johnson & Johnson's McNeil Consumer Healthcare division. A faulty interior cap can get pushed down into the bottle, making it hard to use the dosing syringe.

  4. Gene May Be Linked to Frequent Cold Sores

    A new study suggests that some people may have a genetic predisposition to frequent cold sores.

  5. New Bladder Cancer Warning for Diabetes Drug Actos

    The FDA has issued a new warning of increased bladder cancer risk associated with use of the diabetes drug Actos (pioglitazone).

  6. FDA Approves Hepatitis C Drug Victrelis

    The FDA has approved Victrelis (bocepravir) to treat hepatitis C.

  7. FDA Approves New Restless Legs Syndrome Drug

    The FDA has approved a new drug called Horizant to treat moderate-to-severe restless legs syndrome.

  8. Johnson & Johnson Recalls Even More Tylenol

    Johnson & Johnson's McNeil division has recalled yet another lot of Tylenol, and added 10 lots to its previous Jan. 14 wholesale-level recall of various Tylenol, Benadryl, Sudafed, Sinutab, and Rolaids products.

  9. Recall of Generic Citalopram, Finasteride

    Pfizer subsidiary Greenstone LLC has recalled its generic citalopram antidepressant and its generic prostate drug finasteride due to a label switch. Taking the wrong drug could harm some users.

  10. FDA Approves New Melanoma Treatment Yervoy

    The FDA has approved Bristol-Myers' Yervoy for the treatment of late-stage, metastatic melanoma, a deadly skin cancer. The drug extends survival but does not cure the disease.

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